Update: District Heating and Cooling in Sweden

IDEA is pleased to report that Dr. Sven Werner, Professor, Energy Technology at Halmstad University has published an authoritative update on “District Heating and Cooling in Sweden” in Energy, a scientific journal published by Elsevier. It is written with open access, and can be downloaded free of cost. Dr. Werner encourages sharing the information with your DHC colleagues, but requests that you do not distribute the PDF files itself, since many downloads at the Science direct website will highlight the interest in the DHC subject.

“District heating and cooling in Sweden” (click to access article)

Fig. 4.   Specific carbon dioxide emissions from Swedish district heating systems 1969–2015. Emissions from CHP plants have been estimated according to the energy allocation principle. Heat recycled from recycled gases, waste incineration, and industrial processes have no carbon dioxide emissions in order not to violate the polluter pays principle. (Illustration: Werner, 2017)

Fig. 4. Specific carbon dioxide emissions from Swedish district heating systems 1969–2015. Emissions from CHP plants have been estimated according to the energy allocation principle. Heat recycled from recycled gases, waste incineration, and industrial processes have no carbon dioxide emissions in order not to violate the polluter pays principle. (Illustration: Werner, 2017)

Abstract:
The purpose of this review is to provide a presentation of the background and current position for district heating and cooling in Sweden. The review structure considers the market, technical, supply, environmental, institutional, and future contexts. The main conclusions are high utilization of district heating in Swedish buildings, commitment to the third generation of district heating technology, high proportions of heat recycling and renewable supply, high compliance to European definition of efficient district heating, considerable reductions of fossil carbon dioxide emissions, strong national driving forces from high fossil fuel taxes, and soft district heating regulation based on transparency. District cooling systems are small compared to district heating systems. From strong legislative driving forces, the Swedish heat market became a testing ground for a market situation when fossil fuels are expensive in a heat market. The long-term market solutions have then become district heating in dense urban areas and local heat pumps in suburban and rural areas.

Contact:
Dr. Sven Werner, Professor, Energy Technology
Halmstad University (Högskolan i Halmstad), ETN, PO Box 823,
SE-30118 Halmstad, Sweden
+4635167130

Also see:
New International Review of District Heating and Cooling, Werner, 2017.

 

About IDEA Industry News

EDITOR: Leonard Phillips, IDEA Director of Business Development, International District Energy Association (IDEA), a nonprofit association founded in 1909. len.idea@districtenergy.org; +1 508-366-9339.
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